Tea

 

 

 

Franz Eugen Köhler, Köhler's Medizinal-Pflanzen, 1897:

Tea plant ("Camellia sinensis"). Source: Wikipedia: Tea.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tea: The Story of a Leaf

Episode 1 - The Spirit of Tea

 

Tea: The Story of a Leaf

Episode 2 - The Road’s End

 

Tea: The Story of a Leaf

Episode 3 - Making Tea

 

Tea: The Story of a Leaf

Episode 4 - Foreign Lands, Homeland

 

Tea: The Story of a Leaf

Episode 5 - Time Stops for Tea

 

Tea: The Story of a Leaf

Episode 6 - Humanity in a Teacup

 

Worldwide tea production in 2017.

Source: Wikipedia: Tea.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How tea is enjoyed around the world

 

 

Chinese Green Tea: 

                      How it's made, with Master Gu

 

 

Japanese Green Tea Cultivation - Green Tea Farm

Green Tea Harvest and Processing

 

 

The history of tea in Russia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How To Make Chai Tea: Indian Tea

 

 

Proper British Tea: How to make tea

 

 

How to make Persian Tea!!!

                               Fragrant and Delicious!

 

 

The ancient ceremony of preparing tea in the Sahara

 

 

Perfect Afternoon Tea at Fortnum And Mason

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

 

Tea is an aromatic beverage commonly prepared by pouring hot or boiling water over cured or fresh leaves of the Camellia sinensis, an evergreen shrub native to East Asia. After water, it is the most widely consumed drink in the world. There are many different types of tea; some, like Darjeeling and Chinese greens, have a cooling, slightly bitter, and astringent flavour, while others have vastly different profiles that include sweet, nutty, floral, or grassy notes. Tea has a stimulating effect in humans primarily by its caffeine content.

 

  • Markman Ellis, Richard Coulton, Matthew Mauge: "Empire of Tea: The Asian Leaf that Conquered the World", Reaktion Books, 2018.

Although tea had been known and consumed in China and Japan for centuries, it was only in the seventeenth century that Londoners first began drinking it. Over the next two hundred years, its stimulating properties seduced all of British society, as tea found its way into cottages and castles alike. One of the first truly global commodities and now the world’s most popular drink, tea has also, today, come to epitomize British culture and identity.

This impressively detailed book offers a rich cultural history of tea, from its ancient origins in China to its spread around the world. The authors recount tea’s arrival in London and follow its increasing salability and import via the East India Company throughout the eighteenth century, inaugurating the first regular exchange—both commercial and cultural—between China and Britain. They look at European scientists’ struggles to understand tea’s history and medicinal properties, and they recount the ways its delicate flavor and exotic preparation have enchanted poets and artists. Exploring everything from its everyday use in social settings to the political and economic controversies it has stirred—such as the Boston Tea Party and the First Opium War—they offer a multilayered look at what was ultimately an imperial industry, a collusion—and often clash—between the world’s greatest powers over control of a simple beverage that has become an enduring pastime.

 

  • Mary Lou Heiss: "The Story of Tea: A Cultural History and Drinking Guide", Ten Speed Press, 2007.

Whether it's a delicate green tea or a bracing Assam black, a cup of tea is a complex brew of art and industry, tradition and revolution, East and West. In this sweeping tour through the world of tea, veteran tea traders Mary Lou Heiss and Robert J. Heiss chronicle tea's influence across the globe and provide a complete reference for choosing, drinking, and enjoying this beverage.THE STORY OF TEA begins with a journey along the tea trail, from the lush forests of China, where tea cultivation first flourished, to the Buddhist temples of Japan, to the vast tea gardens of India, and beyond. Offering an insider'­s view of all aspects of tea trade, the Heisses examine Camellia sinensis, the tea bush, and show how subtle differences in territory and production contribute to the diversity of color, flavor, and quality in brewed tea. They profile more than thirty essential tea varietals, provide an in depth guide to tasting and brewing, and survey the customs and crafts associated with tea. Sharing the latest research, they discuss tea's health benefits and developments in organic production and fair trade practices. Finally, they present ten sweet and savory recipes, including Savory Chinese Marbled Eggs and Green Tea Pot de Creme, and resources for purchasing fine tea.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Even the longest journey begins with a first step! Systemic Habitats is online since the 18th of May 2012. This website was created to publish online my ebook "Towards another habitat" on the contemporary architecture and urbanism. Later many other contents were added. For their direct or indirect contribution to its realisation, we would like to thank: Roberto Vacca, Marco Pizzuti, Fiorenzo and Raffaella Zampieri, Antonella Todeschini, All the Amici di Marco Todeschini, Ecaterina Bagrin, Stefania Ciocchetti, Marcello Leonardi, Joseph Davidovits, Frédéric Davidovits, Rossella Sinisi, Pasquale Cascella, Carlo Cesana, Filippo Schiavetti Arcangeli, Laura Pane, Antonio Montemiglio, Patrizia Piras, Bruno Nicola Rapisarda, Ruberto Ruberti, Marco Cicconcelli, Ezio Prato, Sveva Labriola, Rosario Francalanza, Giacinto Sabellotti, All the Amici di Gigi, Ruth and Ricky Meghiddo, Natalie Edwards, Rafael Schmitd, Nicola Romano, Sergio Bianchi, Cesare Rocchi, Henri Bertand, Philippe Salgarolo, Paolo Piva, Norbert Trenkle, Gaetano Giuseppe Magro, Carlo Blangiforti, Mario Ludovico, Riccardo Viola, Giulio Peruzzi, and last but not least Ahmed Elgazzar.   M.L.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

          e x t e r n a l    l i n k s :

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 Number of Visitors from 2012 :

              Thanks for your visit !

 

      M.L.