The Outcasts 4

 

"trash people"

in the societies of the wastefulness

 

 

 

 

 

Zabbaleen: Trash Town.

A whole community in Egypt that lives on rubbish

 

Travel to the Philippines and meet

a Family who eat left over foods from the trash

 

Would you eat recycled landfill meat?

 

ToxiCity: life at Agbobloshie,

the world's largest e-waste dump in Ghana

 

Room With A Loo: "I Live In A Toilet"

 

Inside Nigeria’s biggest scrap yard

 

Philippines: Deliverance

The Slum, Episode 1

 

Philippines: Risky Business

The Slum, Episode 2

 

Philippines Slums

 

The incredible technique of

thieving children at the ATM

 

Live in poverty

 

Zombies of Nairobi

 

The digital dump:

illegal electronics waste trade in Nigeria

 

Inferno Village: when leaving a land of fiery

coal pits is scarier than burning alive

 

Exporting harm:

the high-tech trashing of Asia

 

Not everyone is happy about

Mumbai's Slum Redevelopment

 

Huge fire burns Makoko Slum in Nigeria

 

Computer recycling West Africa style

 

United States uses India as

electronics garbage dump

 

Europe scrambling as China bans foreign

waste-plastic imports from 2018

 

China's growing recycling industry

 

The Yamuna, India's most polluted river

 

The innovative way India's handling

its massive trash problem

 

 

 

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

 

  • Zygmunt Bauman: "Wasted lives. Modernity and its Outcasts", Polity Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom, 2004.

The production of 'human waste' - or more precisely, wasted lives, the 'superfluous' populations of migrants, refugees and other outcasts - is an inevitable outcome of modernization.

It is an unavoidable side-effect of economic progress and the quest for order which is characteristic of modernity. As long as large parts of the world remained wholly or partly unaffected by modernization, they were treated by modernizing societies as lands that were able to absorb the excess of population in the 'developed countries'. Global solutions were sought, and temporarily found, to locally produced overpopulation problems. But as modernization has reached the furthest lands of the planet, 'redundant population' is produced everywhere and all localities have to bear the consequences of modernity's global triumph. They are now confronted with the need to seek - in vain, it seems - local solutions to globally produced problems. The global spread of the modernity has given rise to growing quantities of human beings who are deprived of adequate means of survival, but the planet is fast running out of places to put them. Hence the new anxieties about 'immigrants' and 'asylum seekers' and the growing role played by diffuse 'security fears' on the contemporary political agenda.

With characteristic brilliance, this new book by Zygmunt Bauman unravels the impact of this transformation on our contemporary culture and politics and shows that the problem of coping with 'human waste' provides a key for understanding some otherwise baffling features of our shared life, from the strategies of global domination to the most intimate aspects of human relationships.

 

 

 number of  visitors from 2012 :

                    thanks for your visit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Even the longest journey begins with a first step! Systemic Habitats is online since the 18th of May, 2012. This website was created to publish online my ebook "Towards another habitat" on the contemporary architecture and urbanism; later many other contents were added. For their direct or indirect very important contribution to the realisation of this website, we would like to thank: Roberto Vacca, Marco Pizzuti, Fiorenzo and Raffaella Zampieri, Antonella Todeschini, Ecaterina Bagrin, Stefania Ciocchetti, Marcello Leonardi, Joseph Davidovits, Frédéric Davidovits, Rossella Sinisi, Pasquale Cascella, Carlo Cesana, Filippo Schiavetti Arcangeli, Laura Pane, Antonio Montemiglio, Patrizia Piras, Bruno Nicola Rapisarda, Ruberto Ruberti, Marco Cicconcelli, Ezio Prato, Sveva Labriola, Rosario Fracalanza, Giacinto Sabellotti, all the Amici di Gigi, Ruth and Ricky Meghiddo, Natalie Edwards, Rafael Schmitd, Nicola Romano, Sergio Bianchi, Cesare Rocchi, Henri Bertand, Philippe Salgarolo, Paolo Piva, Norbert Trenkle, Gaetano Giuseppe Magro, Carlo Blangiforti, Mario Ludovico, Riccardo Viola, Giulio Peruzzi, and last but not least the kind Staff of 1&1. M.L.

 

 

 

 

 

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The numbers 0 and 1 of the blue displays

represent the cybernetic digital data flow.